Trump’s move may nudge some GOP states to enlarge Medicaid


Published 6:20 pm, Tuesday, January 23, 2018


WASHINGTON – In an ironic twist, the Trump administration’s embrace of work requirements for low-income people on Medicaid is prompting lawmakers in some conservative states to resurrect plans to expand health care for the poor.

Trump’s move has been widely criticized as threatening the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion. But if states follow through, more Americans could get coverage.



“I think it gives us a chance,” said Kansas state Rep. Susan Concannon, a moderate Republican who pushed unsuccessfully for Medicaid expansion last year in her state.

In Utah, the office of Republican Gov. Gary Herbert said the Trump administration’s willingness to approve work requirements is one of several concessions the state would demand to cover more poor residents through Medicaid.

Utah state Rep. Robert Spendlove, a Republican working on legislation to partially expand Medicaid, said the Trump administration has sent a positive sign. “I have a lot of confidence that they will be willing to work with us and approve this,” Spendlove said.


There’s already an economic argument for states to expand Medicaid, since it means billions of federal dollars for hospitals and medical service providers.

But Republican Mike Leavitt, a former health secretary and Utah governor, said the ability to impose work requirements adds an ideological motivator.

“Republicans want Medicaid to help people who are doing their best to become self-sufficient but need temporary help to get there,” said Leavitt, who now heads a health care consulting firm.

Medicaid is a federal-state collaboration originally meant for poor families and severely disabled people. Over the years, it’s grown to become the largest government health insurance program, now covering 1 in 5 people. Overall, Americans have a favorable view of the program and oppose funding cuts.

Under former President Barack Obama’s health law, states got the option of expanding Medicaid to cover more low-income adults. Thirty-two states expanded, adding 11 million beneficiaries.

But 18 mostly conservative states are still holding out. They include population centers such as Texas, Florida, North Carolina and Virginia – where new Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam has vowed to cajole a divided legislature into expanding Medicaid.

For the first time in the program’s half-century, the Trump administration announced it will approve state proposals requiring “able-bodied adults” to work, study or perform some kind of service. Officials promptly signed off on Kentucky’s work requirement plan.

“There are both political and legal challenges, but as long as it is optional for states, and appropriately thoughtful and nuanced … this can definitely work,” said Matt Salo, director of the nonpartisan National Association of Medicaid Directors. “It could possibly mean the difference between some of the non-expansion states embracing the expansion, or at least ensuring that some of the expansion states maintain political support for the program.”

His group, which represents state officials, does not have a consensus on work requirements.

Advocates for low-income people say such arguments for work requirements are misguided. They contend Medicaid is a health care program and such requirements run contrary to its legally established purpose.

Nonetheless, polls show strong support for requiring “able-bodied” adults on Medicaid to work, said Robert Blendon of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Most of those adults already do.

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